Elephants and Orangutans Chester Zoo

I went to Chester Zoo for the day recently and was really excited about going there again after not visiting for a while, it has always been one of my favourite zoos. One of the animals I was looking forward to visiting the most was the Hi Way Elephant Family and their young calves Nandita, Indali and Aayu, it was fun watching them as they have such playful characters. Nandita and Indali spent a lot of time enjoying mud baths, one of the reasons they like to have mud baths is it is a way to cool off from the sun. Because I have got attached to the elephant family at Chester Zoo the past few years, I could spend all day with them when I visit the zoo. 

Even though I was supposed to photograph the orangutans in the afternoon, it was hard to tear myself away from the elephants. When I went to visit the orangutans on the islands, they were fun to watch and photograph because of their human like behaviour. The keepers leave hammocks in the enclosure as it encourages a natural behaviour the orangutans would do in the wild, whilst I was watching them they used hammocks for shelter. If you are into orangutans, Chester Zoo is a great place to visit for seeing them in a beautiful setting and if you would like to see the orangutans up close you can take a boat ride from the island.

Chester Zoo's conservation Act for Wildlife conservation organisation fund projects in the UK and overseas including teaching people to live with elephants in their natural habitat. One of their campaigns is We Never Forget in memory of Bala and Hari from Chester Zoo who unfortunately passed away from the Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpes Virus, the virus affects young elephants around the world. Through the campaign they are funding research to try and help elephants in zoos and the wild so less are affected by this horrible disease. In the future they hope to find a cure for the virus. Act for Wildlife also help orangutans, the past 10 years they have been working with Hutan Kinabatangan Orangutan Conservation programme to protect the wildlife and orangutans in Borneo. They have got together with Hutan's education programme and their HEAP Team where they provide knowledge about the forests and impact people can have on wildlife. Because of educating people in their communities and working with schools and government departments they have started to build up postive relationships within the community. For more information on their projects please visit www.actforwildlife.org.uk